Acrylic Pouring Spin Technique: Lord of the Rings Inspired Painting

It’s that time of the month again when I take part in the Acrylic Pouring Challenge. Our #FebruaryPouringChallenge was set by Meghan of Ethereal Orb. She set an interesting challenge this month without telling us which colors or which techniques we should use, and left much more open to our imagination. I’ve not yet seen the other challengers’ results as I write this, but I’m sure we’ll be getting a wide variety of very interesting paintings.

Lord of the Rings inspired acrylic pour and spin painting. Video tutorial for the #februarypouringchallenge

Our challenge for the month was to create a painting using pouring techniques of our choice, inspired by these words from the Lord of the Rings.

“All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.”

Now you know that I’m going to pick up on a couple of those words. Gold and glitter jumped out at me right away and of course, I had to create a ring. The keeping of the ring from Sauron and it’s eventual destruction in the fires of the Crack of Doom in Mordor being the main theme of the book, had to be the theme of my painting.  So I created a fiery eye, fixated on a ring of glittering gold.

Materials used in this painting:
Old 12 inch vinyl LP record
8oz squeeze bottles
Assorted acrylic paints in black, red, orange, yellow and gold
Gold Glitter Writer
Avery label (to cover the hole in the record)
Floetrolas my pouring medium
Treadmill silicone oil
Polycrylic protective finish
Wilton cake turntable

7-Diameter-Sculpting-Wheel

Click for Price

You can find all the other videos in the challenge here:
Meghan at Ethereal Orb
Susan Teague
Deby at Acrylic Pouring
Sherry B at Studio Pashnada
Purnima at Symphony of Colors
Kim Beinschroth
Myriam at Myriam’s Nature

Well I have to say I love that! Any opportunity to paint with gold and glitter makes me happy, and with the coat of resin I think this painting is a winner! OK, so not quite in the center, but that reflects my own off-center personality! Maybe Sauron was a bit cross-eyed.

Here are some more photos of this pour for you to check out.

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After being told in high school that she was so bad at art that she should switch to another subject, Deby didn’t paint again for 35 years. Then a stroke released a new wave of creativity and she began exploring with dot painting, abstract and eventually acrylic pouring, and at last the joy of working with color returned.

You don’t need ‘talent’ to be an acrylic pouring artist – just enthusiasm, some basic instruction, and a willingness to try, fail and try again. Paint along with her and learn from her many mistakes, and you’ll soon make great art together.

Comments

    1. Hi there!!! Love your work and the knowledge you share with other creatives!!! Question. How are you spinning it, how did you get the handle?

    2. If I use wood to pour my paint on do I need to prime it in some way first?

    3. Yes I would say that’s probably a good idea. Make sure the surface is smooth, clean and dry, then prime it with a suitable wood primer. Spray primers can work well for uneven surfaces.

  1. Hi Deby, I love watching your videos. I’m new to pouring acrylic and I’m having fun with it. I love the final look with resin. What kind do you use? How hard is it to achieve this smooth shining look?

    1. It’s not that difficult. I started with some mini canvases just to get the hang of it. The resin will give a lovely glossy finish so long as you are careful to get any oils off the surface before you use it. So far I have tried Art Resin and Envirotex Lite. Both seemed to be the same to work with. Here is my resin comparison table – http://amzn.to/2AfiN45

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