Success in an Acrylic Landscape

Thank you for staying with me over the last few weeks. All of the experimentation, research, note taking, and determination has paid off. The painting you see above is the vision I had in my head when I started this project. My goal was to figure out how to use acrylic pouring techniques to create paintings that retain the beautiful unpredictability of a pour, but at the same time be recognizable as a landscape. In this video it all seems to come together. I’m almost embarrassed to tell you how proud I am of this painting. I understand if you aren’t crazy about it. Perhaps you were imagining a different type of poured landscape. I’m thrilled because creating a landscape like the one above is exactly what I set out to do.

 I’m also happy because the advice that I routinely give to my students actually worked for me as well.

If you have an idea, see it through—Don’t Give Up.

Your paintbrush (pencil) is not a magic wand. You have to put the work in.

Learn from other artists and keep an open mind.

Learn from your failures and your successes. Keep what works and avoid things what didn’t.

Although there is always an element that is out of your control when you pour paint, I wouldn’t say I got lucky with this painting. I believe the stage was set for success because of all the work that was done before the painting was made. My experience from the last several paintings allowed me to create this landscape and hopefully several more.

Please watch the video to see exactly how I did it. Meanwhile, here are a few things that pop into mind.

After watching a wonderful video on Youtube from Gina DeLuca called “Landscape / Ocean with Cloudy Effect” I decided to tape off the ground area and then use a straight pour with tilting to create the sky. For the ground area I removed the tape and used the “puddle, line swipe technique” that had worked in the last painting. One of the things I really wanted in this painting was a strong horizon line. I discovered that a paint drenched string would not do the trick. I really thought the string would work, but it didn’t. Instead I used a squirt bottle of black paint to add the horizon line. Finally I added green paint along the horizon line and pushed it around with a craft stick to create the illusion of trees.

I still have a lot to learn about poured landscapes but this feels like a very good starting point to begin fine tuning my landscape pouring techniques. For now I plan to sit back and enjoy my success for a few minutes—before I unwrap another canvas.  

Detail of the poured landscape:

Comments

  1. I am 76 years old – got introduced to acrylics at a “Paint Night”. I didn’t follow directions, since I’m not that kind of persson. But I found that I LOVE to push paint around – LOTS and LOTS of paint – with big bold swoops and splashes. I’ve done a lot of painting since then. Then I watched my first paint pour video. I have’t done one yet – but I shall. I want to end up with abstract landscapes – I’ve been trying to figure out how to do those. This video gave me some more good ideas. Eventually, I’ll be ready to do my first pour.

  2. Steve, I’m working on the exact same ‘pouring landscape’ process as you right now! I’ve watched your videos and it seems like, together you and I are learning what we need to know :-). I also saw Gina Deluca’s video you refer to a few weeks back and you are absolutely right about her sky – it’s awesome!

    I’ve begun embellishing mine (after they dry) with more details in the landscape, especially silhouettes in sunset and night skies, and that’s giving me more definition that I find I like. You might like to try that?

    Basically, I’m a writer and you’re the artist, and I don’t presume to be teaching the art teacher, lol, but let’s all keep learning together! I’ll be waiting for your next landscape video, thanks!

    1. Sharon,

      I would love to see what you have done! I think I’m nearly at the point where I will be using a brush to add more details once the original pour has dried. Haven’t done it yet, but soon. I would love to see some of your silhouetted pours. Not sure how to post pics here but you can always reach me at [email protected].
      Thank you for watching the video and reaching out. Yours, Steve

  3. LOVED HOW YOU EXPLAINED EVERYTHING.I HAVE MADE A SCENE IN 2 OF MY PAINTING BY ACCIDENT.
    I FRAMED THEM THEY STARTED OUT AS A SWIPE POUR.
    SO FAR I HAVE NOT MASTERED MY OTHER PAINTING THEY SEEM TO GET SOME CRACKS. I HAVE TRIED SEVERAL THINGS BUT STILL NOT MASTERED IT.
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR VIDEO.
    SHIRLEY FROM AUSTRALIA

  4. Hi Steve. Greetings from Ireland. I think that your landscape is very convincing. It was great watching you make it happen. I have done about 11 flip cup pours but no landscapes. I will have to try now that I know how to go about it. I haven’t seen Gina’s landscapes but her other paintings are truly gorgeous. Thanks so much for your experimentation. It can be expensive trying out new techniques so you have saved me from potential failure. Thanks again.

    1. i loved how you explained things on your video.
      i also liked your 1st try on the landscape.
      when i done my first swipe i fluked a scene like a land scape not sure how i done it but it was so good i framed it.
      every one thinks i was very clever but as i said i am not sure how it happened.
      the only trouble i have with pour painting is i still get some cracks on my canvas , i have tried diffrent things .
      maybe some day i will get it right .

  5. Really liked your landscape painting. I have done 7 landscapes. My technique is a little different than yours. I pour an inch or so of black/dark paint across bottom, do a small cup pour of transparent yellow, orange, etc. for the sunset/sunrise area. Then I do a blue with purple for the top part of the sky and do some tilting to blend it.I then pull up trees with a stir stick… Looks realistic and if you accidently (I did) touch it you can make it a moon… I know this is not as difficult as what you did but I have sold them all. If you want to see one go to FB @ Saralee Rehkopf and click on shortcut for photos of my work. I embellished some of them with a fan brush to make grass and a waterfall.

  6. Thanks so much for your hard work. I’ve been wanting to do a landscape pour but now I’m going to do one for sure!

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