Starburst Exploding Swipe Painting

You know I love to swipe my paintings and today I’m adding ALL my colors for a fun circular swipe. I’ll be swiping twice too, so let’s see what that does!

Video tutorial and demo for how to swipe poured acrylic paints to create this starburst swipe painting. Fluid acrylics video tutorial.

I usually swipe in a straight line, don’t we all (mostly), but I have done one wavy swipe in the past on this one. I’m still swiping in a straight line but instead of from top to bottom or left to right, on this one, I lay out the paints in a circle and then swipe out from the center. I’m conscious that the yellows and the orange are transparent paints and I’ve had trouble in the past trying to swipe transparent over opaque so I wondered at the time what this would look like when it dried.

Materials used in this painting:
12-inch economy canvas from multi pack
Blick Student Acrylics
Art Alternatives Acrylic paints
Floetrol
Treadmill belt lubricant

Recipe:
These paints were all pre-mixed in my squeezy bottles to make this super quick and simple. The recipe would have been 1 part Floetrol to 2 parts paint and water as needed. Each bottle would contain a few drops of treadmill belt lubricant – about 1 -2 drops per 20g of original paint measurement approximately.

I had a lot of fun with this painting. The pre-mixed paints made it really quick and easy to lay out all the colors so I could just run into my room and paint, no need to spend a lot of time mixing up ready to pour. That’s a good thing because it’s so darned hot in there right now that as much as I want to paint, I have to keep indoors time to a minimum this time of year! Luckily the heat doesn’t seem to affect my paintings, although it can make varnishing a bit of a challenge. I decided to use the UV-Resistant spray varnish on this one. You can see the texture of the paint more than with the usual Polycrylic and its not so glossy, but good to know those bright colors are protected.

Wow-wee. Will you look at that! I am so happy with this painting and even my husband admits that it is one of his favorites. The explosion of cells out from the center looks very different to the usual straight swipes.

As usual, enjoy the images of the painting below, both wet and dry, and closeups of the pretty details.

After being told in high school that she was so bad at art that she should switch to another subject, Deby didn’t paint again for 35 years. Then a stroke released a new wave of creativity and she began exploring with dot painting, abstract and eventually acrylic pouring, and at last the joy of working with color returned.

You don’t need ‘talent’ to be an acrylic pouring artist – just enthusiasm, some basic instruction, and a willingness to try, fail and try again. Paint along with her and learn from her many mistakes, and you’ll soon make great art together.

Comments

    1. I also love this painting it’s beautiful keep up good work I enjoy working with you

  1. I love your videos. You are so good at explaining everything. I am new to pouring so need to learn as much as I can. I just loved this one so will have to try. I did try your black garden swipe (can’t remember what you called it sorry). It worked out great but not quite like yours but am happy with it. I think I muck around with them after swiping too much. I will be watching more of your videos. Thanks very much. I am in Australia so it is a bit hard to get the same stuff that you use, eg floetrol. But I am looking.

    1. Hi Kim I am in Sydney Australia and I purchased Floetrol in Bunnings. It wasn’t very expensive. Hope this helps

  2. I am enjoying your paintings so much. Ive not yet had opportunity to try a pour. Your work is inspuring me to do so.
    Thank you

  3. thank you for showing this in such wonderful detail. I’ve just started “pouring” and I’ve had mixed results………..swiping has been a disaster so far, but I love it, so I’ll keep going. sometime, i hope to show one that I’m proud of.

  4. Como en cada video nos demuestra la gran creatividad que tiene al hacer sus cuadros y lo mas importante sabe escoger y adecuar cada color en el área y orden, en que el resultado final es y pletórico y espectacular. Gracias por sus videos y sus explicaciones , paso a paso, ha sido genial, como en cada obra que nos muestra, son bellísimas.

  5. Hi Deby

    Love everything you do, however I’m having great trouble getting cells, do you think the problem is my paint, some of them are System 3 acrylics?

    Viv

    1. Usually all acrylic paints should be good to make cells, so its most likely your paint consistency or the ratio/recipe for the other products you are adding. Are you in our FB chat group? There you can describe your recipe and show a photo of your typical results and we can try to diagnose the problem and help you get the results you are looking for.

  6. Hi Deby thanks for the video that’s amazing the cells the depth it is amazing. I see that you used Dick Blick student acrylics. I’m going to go to the website and order some. The only thing I get at the stores is the regular brands that are ok but for the pours I think the paint needs to be iridescent and opaque. Am I correct to assume this? Thanks again

    1. There are very few rules when it comes to pouring, and many of them can be broken. I would say just go with paints and colors that you like without worrying too much about whether they are opaque or transparent. Consistency and the recipe are more important. Those are my favorite paints though, you would do well with them I’m sure.

  7. I’m in Tasmania and, like Susan, i buy my Floetrol at Bunnings. I’ve recently found our local inspirations paint store also sell it and in several different size quantities whereas the Bunnings here only have 4litre bottles, Bunnings also have a product called easy flow, it’s a bit thinner though but it works

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