How to Create Designs on Poured Tiles with Texture Paste and Stencils

I’ve been looking for ways to bring tiles together that don’t quite match and make them a set. I tried stenciling and oh dear, I am so bad at crafty things. I messed up in so many ways. I don’t think I have the patience for it. However, I think the idea of adding a matching motif on painted tiles is a good one and so I was determined to give it another try. This time, I will be stenciling with texture paste.

Using texture paste to add a stencilled design on to acrylic pour painted ceramic tiles. Video tutorial.

I am a person who is often in a hurry. Some might say I’m impatient (yes hubby I’m looking at you.) So when I had to sit and dab tiny amounts of paint on a stencil with a teeny tiny brush, I quickly got a bit bored, added too much paint and then really didn’t get a nice crisp finish. I think this texture paste is going to be more my style. A lot more ‘instant’ and one layer is all you need for a thick and dimensional finish. I love that you can color it with acrylic paints too, so you can make your texture any color you like. For this one, I’m going to stick with a classic black and use the fluid acrylics to add color.

Materials used in this project:
DecoArt Americana Texture Medium
DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics in Black
Pre-Painted Ceramic Tiles
DecoArt Doily stencil
Palette knife

Ooh, now that is perfect! So easy, so quick and a perfectly crisp result. Now I can add a little extra design and style to my painted tiles, and those tiles from leftover bits and pieces of paint where they don’t quite match, now I can make them more into a set. If you look carefully, you may be able to spot in the pictures below that 3 of the tiles look a little different to the other. I’ll have another article coming up soon on a super-duper new sparkly product that I’m trying out!

Here are a few more photos of the nice results that I got with the texture paste.

After being told in high school that she was so bad at art that she should switch to another subject, Deby didn’t paint again for 35 years. Then a stroke released a new wave of creativity and she began exploring with dot painting, abstract and eventually acrylic pouring, and at last the joy of working with color returned.

You don’t need ‘talent’ to be an acrylic pouring artist – just enthusiasm, some basic instruction, and a willingness to try, fail and try again. Paint along with her and learn from her many mistakes, and you’ll soon make great art together.

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