Paint a Sunset Scene With Acrylic Pouring Swipe Technique

I had a comment on one of my videos on YouTube, this one, the triple dirty pour sunset painting. Someone mentioned that it might look good as a swipe and that prompted me to try this painting today. I’ll use some of those original colors plus a couple more, swipe and see what we get.

Sunset colors acrylic swipe painting. Vivid colors make for awesome cells in this video tutorial for a sunset acrylic pour and swipe painting

I find colors difficult to choose for my paintings and I admit, I often make some terrible choices! So when it came to sunset colors, I did scratch my head for a while. But Pinterest is a great resource for art inspiration, so I searched for sunset color palettes and saved some to my Pinterest boards. There are a lot of very varied sunset images, but this is the one that I have chosen. I’m going to use yellow, orange, red, magenta and purple, with some gold thrown in just because I love metallics.

Materials used in this painting:
Gallery wrapped canvas
Assorted acrylic paints in chrome yellow, bright orange, warm red, magenta, violet and gold
Floetrol
Treadmill belt silicone
8oz squeeze bottles
Polycrylic protective finish

Recipe:
All paints were premixed into my squeezy bottles, at the ratio of 2 parts paint to 1 part Floetroland water as needed for a creamy pouring consistency. 10-12 drops of treadmill silicone per 8oz bottle.

Wowzers, those colors! Sadly I spoilt it by having a bit too much orange and forgetting that orange takes over like crazy in my paintings. It didn’t help that the orange paint was a bit too thin and runny as well, and it really kept moving a lot after the swipe, taking a lot of the paint off the sides and creating some weird shapes. Once I have the painting finished, I’ll share that in an upcoming update video of all the projects I didn’t get dry and varnished in time. But the colors – wow, I’ll certainly be using these again in another project. Forgetting the red, and the fact the orange was too overpowering, the magenta, purple and yellow were awesome!

Here are some images of the pour while it was wet and some closeups of the details.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

After being told in high school that she was so bad at art that she should switch to another subject, Deby didn’t paint again for 35 years. Then a stroke released a new wave of creativity and she began exploring with dot painting, abstract and eventually acrylic pouring, and at last the joy of working with color returned.

You don’t need ‘talent’ to be an acrylic pouring artist – just enthusiasm, some basic instruction, and a willingness to try, fail and try again. Paint along with her and learn from her many mistakes, and you’ll soon make great art together.

Comments

  1. Hi just love your blog thank you for this inspirational direction to my art. I am a beginner so I have a few questions regarding what you mix with your paint or is all of this in your book/PDF file?
    I have just be watering my paints down with water.
    Thank you again

    1. Welcome Jane. You can just add water but most manufacturers recommend that you don’t add much more than 10% (some say 30%) max to your paints because they become too thin and the paint molecule are too far apart for the paint to stay together well over time. Its best to use some kind of medium which includes binders to help hold everything together. Yes, there are recipes in the ebook and in the video class, but I also usually give my recipe in my videos too. Most painters start off copying a recipe of another painter, but overtime you will get used to developing your own and working with products that give you the best results. Good luck.

  2. Get the ebook/and/or the course-well worth the time and money! Deby, you are such an inspiration!

  3. Deby thanks so much for sharing this sunset video. I’ve been wanting to do a pour like this and I hope when I do it’s just as beautiful.

Join the Discussion