Simple Acrylic Pouring Spin Technique Painting

One of the things I love the most about our chat group is how inspiring it can be, and how people so openly share their ideas, results, experiments and more. One such case recently caused a storm of excitement in the group when Bobbi shared her ‘eye’ painting. She hasn’t let on how she created it, and says she hasn’t been able to recreate it since, but I just had to give it a try!

How to create simple spin art abstract paintings with acrylic pouring, and a turntable. Make stunning paintings that look like an eye.

I decided on a very simple color palette. Just black and dark blue for the background, and then white on top in circles to spin out. I wasn’t sure how she created the design, but it certainly radiates out from the center in a perfect ring, so I decided to leave that center open and make rings of white to spin out. Would it resemble the wonderful original or create something quite different?

Materials used in this painting:
Old 12 inch vinyl LP record
Assorted acrylic paints in black, white and ultramarine blue
Floetrol
Treadmill silicone
Avery round glossylabel (to cover the hole in the record)
Polycrylic protective finish
8oz squeeze bottles
Wilton cake turntable to spin

Well, in the end, it looked nothing like the inspiration piece. I think she must have spun her painting much, much faster to get the effect of the thin lines of paint coming out so evenly from the center. And perhaps her paint was much thinner than mine too. But I still really like the final finished painting I got from this. The bits of blue just take the simple black and white up a notch, and I always love the spin effect on the paints and how it creates such interesting shapes.

Check out more images from this pour here in the slideshow.

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After being told in high school that she was so bad at art that she should switch to another subject, Deby didn’t paint again for 35 years. Then a stroke released a new wave of creativity and she began exploring with dot painting, abstract and eventually acrylic pouring, and at last the joy of working with color returned.

You don’t need ‘talent’ to be an acrylic pouring artist – just enthusiasm, some basic instruction, and a willingness to try, fail and try again. Paint along with her and learn from her many mistakes, and you’ll soon make great art together.

Comments

  1. Deby,

    Sounds like you need to grease the bearings on your spin plate. The added grease should help spin faster and not sound so grating.
    All the Best for the New Year

    1. Sadly its not that sort of thing. It’s just a plastic cake turntable and not designed at all to spin smoothly or at high speed. I wish it did!

  2. Thanks for your great videos, Deby, and your “down to earth “ and encouraging approach . I too am not good at realism – but love creating and appreciate your tips – like stencils.

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